Reasons Menopause Changes Your Blood Pressure

menopause

Women are at increased risk for high blood pressure after menopause, but researchers are unsure why. Some doctors blame high blood pressure after menopause on the hormonal changes women experience, while others say that menopausal weight gain increases the risk of high blood pressure.

High blood pressure is just one of the symptoms women can experience during menopause. Women can ease these symptoms by adopting a few healthy habits, several of which Motherhoodcommunity.com articulates helpfully.

Signs of High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure doesn’t usually have noticeable symptoms until it becomes severe. These symptoms can include severe headaches, nosebleeds, confusion, vision problems, and irregular heartbeat. Women experiencing any of these symptoms should see a doctor immediately.

Because high blood pressure can go unnoticed, it’s important to check your blood pressure. Ask your doctor how often your blood pressure should be monitored.

menopause High blood pressure

Other Symptoms of Menopause

Increased risk for high blood pressure isn’t the only symptom of menopause. The time of life when a woman’s ovaries stop producing hormones and monthly cycles end – usually around 50 – has other noticeable symptoms. These include:

Mood Swings

Fluctuations in estrogen and progesterone can disrupt the production of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that regulates moods.

Weight Gain

Slower metabolism and decreases in muscle can result in menopausal weight gain. Your doctor could diagnose hypothyroidism, a condition that lowers metabolism and can occur in the menopausal years.

Hot Flashes

Decreases in estrogen affect the hypothalamus, a part of the brain that controls body temperature as well as appetite and sleep cycles.

Vaginal Dryness

The drop in estrogen during menopause also contributes to vaginal dryness and thinning and inflammation of the vaginal walls.

Trouble Sleeping

The hot flashes of menopause and the effects of reduced estrogen on the hypothalamus can add up to sleepless nights. Lack of sleep can lead to weight gain, which can increase the risk of high blood pressure.

Decreased Libido

The hormonal changes of menopause can also lower a woman’s sex drive.

Women health

Ways to Have a Healthier Menopause

The gradual hormonal changes of menopause can be major factors in a woman’s health. Hormone replacement therapy is thought to increase the chance of breast cancer, so merely replacing estrogen isn’t an answer for everyone. Following these steps can lead to healthier and happier menopause, though.

Talk With Your Doctor

Consulting with your family physician is a great first step toward dealing with the symptoms of menopause. Your doctor can detect elevated blood pressure and advise on treating other symptoms.

Drink Plenty of Water

Dehydration can cause increases in blood pressure, so make sure to drink enough water. Drinking about 80 ounces of water a day is optimal. If you don’t like the taste of water, add a few drops of food-grade essential oils.

Calm Down

Anxiety and stress can raise blood pressure, so taking steps to create a sense of calm in your life is essential to dealing with the risk of high blood pressure. Using essential oils such as lavender, rose oil, or chamomile is known to help reduce stress levels and tension.

Get a Good Night’s Sleep

When you can, try to get at least seven or eight hours of restorative sleep at night. You can boost your chances of this by putting your smartphone or laptop computer away at least an hour before bedtime. Try sipping a cup of chamomile tea to relax.

Meditate Daily

Our lives can be so hectic. Slow down to include meditation and breathing exercises each day to bring greater relaxation and reduce stress.

Eat a Healthy Diet

Including energy-giving foods such as organic kale, arugula, asparagus, berries, avocados, and pineapple in your diet will give you sustained energy. In contrast, processed foods often spike blood sugar and lead to a quick drop in energy and feelings of wellness.

Move More

Menopause may reduce metabolism but you can increase the calories burned by moving more. Simply going for a walk or practicing yoga can help you burn more calories while strengthening your heart and reducing stress.

See Also: What Doctor to See for Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs): Guidelines to Raise Awareness

High Blood Pressure and Menopause

The cause of high blood pressure during menopause isn’t as important as detecting and treating it. High blood pressure can lead to serious complications such as heart attacks and strokes, so visiting your physician is key to staying healthy.

Healthy lifestyle changes can reduce the chances of developing high blood pressure during menopause – visit motherhoodcommunity.com to know more about this. A few simple steps can boost health, energy, and peace while reducing stress and anxiety. It’s important to manage your health so contact your physician today;

Family Medicine Austin

Written by Fay Smith